THE FUTURE IS ACCESSIBLE

ADA-compliant, pedestrian-friendly crosswalk devices

Improve walkability, accessibility, and safety with Polara’s industry-leading accessible pedestrian signals (APS) and push buttons for crosswalks.

Go to the iDS/iNS product page   What is an APS?

PROWAG changed the rules for crosswalks

Are your pedestrian push buttons PROWAG compliant? We break down the new rules for you.

THE FUTURE IS ACCESSIBLE

ADA-COMPLIANT, PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY CROSSWALK DEVICES

Improve walkability, accessibility, and safety with Polara’s industry-leading accessible pedestrian signals (APS) and push buttons for crosswalks

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iDS 

The iDS model, built on the iNS platform, provides touchless iDetect activation with inconspicuous, weather-proof radar and an adjustable detection range of 1-20 inches.

iNS

Our industry-leading APS provides audible indications (tone and/or speech message) to pedestrians with blindness or low vision with the push of a button.

1,000+
Cities

450,000+
Units Installed

1,000,000s
people served

Industry-leading tech

From piezo to PedApp, Polara has been setting the pace of innovation in the industry for more than 25 years.

Proven performance & durability

Long-term exposure to the elements is the ultimate test and Polara’s systems have consistently proven they are built to last.

Nation-wide compliance

All Polara products have been designed to comply with relevant federal regulations, including the ADA, MUTCD, and PROWAG.

Our Products

Accessible Crosswalk Solutions

iDS / iNS

Enhance crosswalk accessibility and achieve full PROWAG compliance with the most reliable and versatile Accessible Pedestrian Signal (APS) on the market.

iNX

Increase safety at unsignalized crossings with an MUTCD-compliant, energy-efficient Audible Information Device (AID).

Bulldog

Made from die-cast aluminum and marine-grade stainless steel, our best-selling Bulldog pedestrian push button is reliable, versatile, and virtually indestructible.

PedApp®

Access audible crossing information and remotely activate pedestrian signals from your smartphone. Compatible with our iDS/iNS APS.

ADA compliant
PROWAG
MUTCD compliant
Buy America compliant

 “APS are an acknowledged solution to [the] problem of inaccessibility… They are essential safety features.”

Hon. Paul A. Engelmayer
United States District Judge

Source

“The audiotactile information that APS provide is something I have spoken about a great deal. I truly feel that APS are an important part of the civic infostructure.”

Jessie Lorenz
Disability Rights Advocate

Source

“More cities need this technology to help all of us as citizens stay safe.”

– Katie Fredrick
Community Manager and Accessibility Lead

Source

 

Accessibility Requirements

Transportation networks should be accessible to and usable by people of all ages and abilities, including those with vision and hearing loss, mobility loss, and cognitive disabilities. In the US–and around the world–numerous statutes and regulations exist to ensure transportation infrastructure is designed to serve the needs of all pedestrians. Here’s what you need to know.

ADA Compliant

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

The ADA is a broad civil rights statute that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including the pedestrian environment. It requires all government units with 50+ employees to develop an ADA transition plan to remove physical barriers and improve access. Cities continue to be sued in federal court for failing to provide access features like curb ramps and APS.

Learn more about the ADA

PROWAG

Public Rights of Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG)

PROWAG is a set of scoping and technical standards that help traffic engineers and planners build accessible routes along public streets. Developed by the US Access Board, it requires audible push buttons anywhere a pedestrian signal or warning device is provided, including at crosswalks at intersections, midblock, and roundabouts. 

Learn more about PROWAG

MUTCD compliant

Manual for Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)

The MUTCD is published by the FHWA to set the standards used by transportation professionals across the country to install and maintain traffic control devices on public roadways. Section 4K.01-5 contains technical provisions for APS, including standards for placement, tactile arrows, locator tones, and information messages. 

Learn more about the MUTCD

What are accessible pedestrian signals?

Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) are devices that provide auditory, visual, and vibrotactile information to pedestrians who are blind or who have low vision, who may also have hearing loss, so they can know when they should begin to cross at a signalized intersection.

APS translate visual pedestrian indications to other sensory formats, enabling people with disabilities to navigate cities safely and comfortably.

I

the impact of accessibility

“The meaning of APS crystallized for me eight months ago when I got off the streetcar at the wrong stop. I was in an unfamiliar place, completely blind and in the middle of a busy street trying to orient myself.  I could hear the locator tone of the Polara Navigator. I found the unit, read the braille, and was immediately able to determine what streets I was at. I decided to walk the rest of the route to my destination.

The APS units along the way enabled me to check the names of streets and cross with the Walk cycle on streets that were unfamiliar to me. I got a little more exercise that morning and wasn’t even late for my appointment! It was the first time I have ever felt like I live in a fully accessible community.”

-Jessie Lorenz, Disability Rights Advocate [source]

What are accessible pedestrian signals?

Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) are devices that provide auditory, visual, and vibrotactile information to pedestrians who are blind or who have low vision, who may also have hearing loss, so they can know when they should begin to cross at a signalized intersection.

APS translate visual pedestrian indications to other sensory formats, enabling people with disabilities to navigate cities safely and comfortably.

I

the impact of accessibility

“The meaning of APS crystallized for me eight months ago when I got off the streetcar at the wrong stop. I was in an unfamiliar place, completely blind and in the middle of a busy street trying to orient myself.  I could hear the locator tone of the Polara Navigator. I found the unit, read the braille, and was immediately able to determine what streets I was at. I decided to walk the rest of the route to my destination.

The APS units along the way enabled me to check the names of streets and cross with the Walk cycle on streets that were unfamiliar to me. I got a little more exercise that morning and wasn’t even late for my appointment! It was the first time I have ever felt like I live in a fully accessible community.”

-Jessie Lorenz, Disability Rights Advocate [source]

LEARN

Pedestrian Safety and Universal Access